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How to grow microgreens at home - Printable Version

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How to grow microgreens at home - magnolia - 12-04-2020

Things you will need:

  1. A shallow container
  2. seeds
  3. Soil or tissue paper for growth medium
  4. A spray bottle filled with water
Seed selection

As a beginner you can use seeds you would find in your homes such as fenugreek, mustard, coriander, fennel and basil seeds as these can be easily grown as microgreens.

The container

Microgreens don’t need to be planted deep to grow so a shallow pot or a shallow container would be enough to grow your microgreens. Make sure to place a few drainage holes so that any excess water can be drained.

The growing medium

Living in the metro, it can be hard to find soil around unless you buy it. So for growing microgreen, if you don’t have any soil handy you can just layer a couple of tissue papers and use that as your growing medium.

Putting it altogether

Once you’ve selected the seed or seeds you want to grow, layer the container with soil upto one or two inches thick (or the tissue paper) and spray it with water to make the growing medium moist.

No perfection is needed when you plant microgreens, so just go ahead and spread those seeds any which way. Cover the seeds with a thin layer of soil and spray it with water.

Keep the tray in a place where there is no direct sunlight so that the soil doesn't lose its moisture and allow the seeds to germinate.

Once the seeds start to germinate, expose them to indirect sunlight so that the leaves don’t dry up. Ideally, by the 10th or 12th day you can harvest the seeds, as they might become bitter the longer you wait to harvest them.

Things to keep in mind

Ensure to use seeds that have not been treated with any chemicals 
Don’t over water your microgreens